Future of Software Testing: Developers Shouldn’t Be Testers

Software testing – and the people who work in the industry – are changing. One of the major reasons behind this change is the need to get products to market faster. Consumers don’t want to wait for the next product release or latest feature update. This shift away from deferred gratification is not only causing software testing to change, but also the role of the tester. Development and testing need to work more closely together and come up with ideas for improving the product. But does that mean that testers should become developers? Testers Still Need to Be Independent Roles Many companies believe that testers should take on more skills, including coding and programming. While testers should become more technical with their skillsets, they don’t need to become full-fledged programmers or developers. Testers offer a unique perspective that developers and programmers don’t offer to the process. But These Roles Need to Change In the past, testers were only viewed as the people responsible for “catching bugs”. Yet, their role is more important than that. The true goal of testers should be to ensure that product is stable not only before it’s released, but long after it’s distributed to the consuming public. To do this, testers need to be part of the development process – not only to find bugs and flaws after the fact. They need to be there throughout the process to ensure that vulnerabilities are never written into the code. This helps prevent stoppages later in the process. And They Need to Have a Team Mentality This not only applies to working with developers, but also external...

Software Testing Trends for 2016

2016 is here. And as a new year starts, it’s time to start focusing on new trends. Software testing isn’t immune to new developments, and companies must keep these in mind as they put in place practices and processes. To assist you with this, here are some software testing trends to keep in mind. The Internet of Things (IoT) should be more than simply company jargon: IoT became a hot trend over the last year. While the number of connected devices are rapidly growing, testing has not kept up with demand. Testing procedures will be put in place now to ensure that current products are secure and working as intended, and so teams can keep up with IoT expansion. No one-size-fits-all testing: Most testing teams come up with a single overarching testing plan, and they try to get every project to fit into this one master plan. The problem with this approach is that each project is different. Testing plans need to be contextualized based on the product. Organizations will still need to create a master guideline for testing, but project-based testing plans will start to take off as teams look to test products from different angles. Security will become more important: Security is already a major reason why testing is so important. Expect the importance of security to continue to grow, especially with businesses now allowing more and more access to sensitive data from websites. Security testing will become a major part of the entire testing process as opposed to being restricted to the end of the process. We at iBeta know how important testing is to every...

3 Common Issues with the Software Development Process

Software development process issues have been around since the inception of software development. Improving software development productivity should be the main focus of all who work on teams, especially leads and managers. Yet before issues can be tackled, teams need to understand what issues could arise in the course of the development process. Here, we cover three of the most common problems experienced within among software dev teams. Communication: Communication is a problem among many teams across many industries. Development teams are not immune, but miscommunication in development teams can lead to poorly made products that don’t meet the customer needs. Misunderstanding among teams can also lead to missed deadlines and feature requests. Poor Scheduling: Aggressive timelines are one thing; unrealistic timelines are another. Projects need adequate time to be built. If not enough time is given for features, testing and fixes to occur, major issues will occur. While clients might be looking for a completed project as soon as possible, project managers must explain why more time is needed. If a client is being unreasonable and not accepting practical pushback, teams should consider whether or not they should take on the client. Lack of testing: Little to no testing often results from overly aggressive timelines. Yet testing must be a part of the process. Testing ensures that the product is working as intended and that there are no bugs or issues. No one wants to wait until a customer either complains or returns an item to find out that there was a problem. The software development process is complicated enough. Proper communication, planning and testing can help ensure...

Avoid the Holiday Blues: Test Your Site to Prevent Lost Orders

The holiday season – from Black Friday through the day after Christmas – is when many retailers make most of their profits for the entire year. Yet, one of their major assets – their ecommerce website – if not properly tested, may be costing them more profit than they realize. Lack of Testing Could Equal Crashed Holiday Sales The number one reason as to why ecommerce sites crash is typically due to lack of testing. Marketers, business owners or sales people needed to get an updated or brand new site up before the holiday rush so they skimped on taking the time to properly test it. This often leads to the following issues: Poor Load Times: Consumers want to quickly surf websites to find out if the site has what they’re looking for and to determine how much it costs. If a site takes too long to load, potential customers aren’t going to wait around to determine this. They’re going to bounce to the next site. Bad Shopping Cart: Many consumers get all the way to the checkout process and then abandon their cart. Why? Sometimes, they changed their minds. Other times, it’s due to cart issues. Major cart problems can lead to significant loss of sales. Common issues with carts include taking too long to process orders, taking too much time to load the next screen or simply being too complicated. Filters not working: Oftentimes, websites have filters for different sizes, colors, availability, etc. If filters are not properly working, then a customer may assume that you don’t have what they need. For example, let’s say that you...

How to Be a Good Developer: Avoid Emulators

Everyone wants to be good at their jobs. They want to create good, robust products that work and provide clients with what they need. Yet, everyone is also under pressure to get goods and products out of the door and into client hands. For developers, they think that the best way to do this is to shorten the testing process by using emulators or simulators. The problem with these, however, is that they don’t actually mimic real-life situations – which can only be found when using a real device. Here are three reasons why you should avoid using emulators and simulators: People are not Machines: Emulators and simulators are designed to mimic what most users would do with a product. What this fails to take into account, however, is that people do not all “function” the same. For example, some people may access an application with a mouse while another with their finger or a stylus.  These interactions can also be seen on real devices – in real life environments. Users on mobile devices especially will have different operating conditions, including low battery, poor WiFi or other interruptions that may affect how applications work. Other software programs affect how your application works: Real devices have different operating systems, apps and games. These can negatively affect how an applications works on the device. Plus, other apps can interfere with the functioning of your app. If developers are building applications to work the same across brand models, then they’re not taking in the quirks of individual devices. A major issue that many developers run into is that graphics across devices can...

Common Misconceptions of Software Testing

Software developers and maintenance teams don’t always understand quality assurance and testing. Misconceptions often lead to antagonistic relationships between the two groups: The former wants to get the project out the door as quickly as possible, but the latter often “slows down” the process with testing for issues and vulnerabilities. It’s time to dispel the common misconceptions and realize that both parties are equally valuable and have their place within the larger development cycle. Automated Testing Finds All the Bugs While automated testing can be useful in certain circumstances, you cannot completely rely on it. If you want it part of the mix as a “final check”, that’s fine. Automated testing, however, should be performed after manual testing. According to Dot Graham, well-known software test consultant and author, “automated testing doesn’t come out of a box (or a download). You get an engine, but not a whole car.” She recommends keeping some tests manual. Software Testers Don’t Need to be Involved Early in a Project Many people in upper-management and developers feel that testers only need to plug into the project during the end stages. This couldn’t be farther from the truth. Testing must be added to project timelines and estimates before work is even started. Plus, testing needs to occur throughout the project. If not, then projects will run over if testing takes longer than anticipated or if major bugs are found. If the latter happens, then work may have to be redone, causing further delays. Anyone can be Testers Some teams believe that developers can also do the testing since testers – in their opinion – don’t...
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